History

  • Village of Episkopi

    The village of Episkopi in the Paphos district is a traditional stone-built village 11 kms north-east of Paphos.. It is located on the west bank of the Ezousa river at an altitude of 190 m.

    The village has been known with the same name since the Frankish era because at the time of King James Β΄ (1460-1473 ), the Orthodox Bishop of Paphos moved here from his see in Polis Chrysochou. Consequently the village owes its name from the fact that it was the see of the Bishop. It was previously known as Komi.

  • Village of Episkopi

    Episkopi Village Captured From Google Maps

  • Population of Episkopi Village

    Since 1881 the population of Episkopi has fluctuated, due mainly to rural exodus. The population of the village works mainly in Paphos but there are still residents employed in agriculture and livestock. The main crops are vines (wine varieties), cereals, forage plants, almond, vegetables and citrus. Goats and sheep are also kept.

  • episkopi_village_population_eng

    Episkopi Village Population

The population of the village works mainly in Paphos but there are still residents employed in agriculture and livestock. The main crops are vines (wine varieties), cereals, forage plants, almond, vegetables and citrus. Goats and sheep are also kept.

On the bank of the Esouza river, opposite the village, are the surviving ruins of a small monastery dedicated to the Holy Cross, which was build during the residence of the famous hermit St. Hilarion in the village. Below the village, in the riverbed, the massive rock of Atsoupa is supposed to have been thrown by the saint against a demon. The famous hermit with a disciple settled on a hill outside the village, near a former temple, performing many miracles. Later, a church dedicated to the saint was built at base of the Rock, which can still be seen today. A new church has been built at the top of the Rock, where the tomb of the Saint is found.

The communities of Episkopi and Kallepia are connected by a Nature trail, 8 km in length. It passes by the abandoned turkish-Cypriot village of Moronero, where the ruins of the church of Agios Genadios are found .